The Role of Digital Content in Hiring and Retaining New talent as a Media Agency

If there is one term that has become a buzzword in the past few years, it is ‘millennial’. Today, more and more media agencies are realising the importance of making their message appealing to the twenty-to-thirty-something audience of today. But what about recruitment?

The world is changing, and so is employment. With the new wave of millennials now ready for employment, agencies must adapt to their interest and vision of the world to recruit and retain their interest in a highly competitive industry.

Last month, we took part in the D&AD New Blood festival, which celebrates new talent about to enter the design industry. This led us to reflect on the ways into which the employment scene is changing in the modern day.

Here are our main takeaway points:

 

Experience and aspiration

The millennial employee of today is more interested in building experience and doing a job that they love rather than climbing the social work ladder. Recent research has shown that in order to progress through the creative career ranks, individuals should stay on average 2 years in a position before changing jobs. As such, employers must adapt their HR strategy to stay one step ahead of the curve in recruitment. They should also aim to provide regular incentives and promotions for employees who remain in their organisation.

 

Multi-talented employees are key

It used to be that being an expert in a field rather was the ultimate goal in a professional’s career trajectory. However, today this is no longer the case; now knowing a bit of everything is often preferred, especially for companies who are looking to make savings by employing individuals who can cover various job roles. In the world of millennials, where slashers flourish, multi skilled individuals hold more value than they used to. This is especially true in the media and ad agency sector, where it is important to have an integrated view of the creative process in order to execute a project.

 

Social media-centric recruitment

Millennials are not only social media natives but digital natives as well. No longer is online social networking something used purely for entertainment, today it is one of the first places people look for jobs. Millennial see their social media profiles as an extension of their personality, and so it is a good way for employers to spot the types of characters they want to be part of their team. Today Instagram has become a common place for new designers and artists to display their portfolios, so media agencies should maintain a strong presence on these platforms and keep an eye out for fresh new talent.

 

While employers pay close attention to the social media channels of their future employees, the opposite is equally true. Millennials use the online social profiles of corporations and their employees to get a sense of the company’s culture. Brands should therefore value showcasing their culture through their online marketing strategies. Also, in order to convey a positive image at all levels of the company, social media etiquette training should be an important focus point for HR teams. Our creative team has previously been involved with creating content to inform the employees of Rolls Royce Engineering about the company’s social media policy and to promote social media awareness in the workplace:


In a world driven by Millennials, it is vital to be responsive to the changing recruitment sphere. Employees need to be valued as multi-talented individuals, to be given opportunities for recognised progression, and be traced and attracted through creative means. So, bring your recruitment message up to the same level as the output of your media agency’s work and you will see the results.

 

Photo: Photo by Ian Schneider on Unsplash

5 Pieces of Advice to Grow a Content Agency

Last month, our team once again collaborated with D&AD, this time for their New Blood Festival in celebration of new artistic talents. As part of the event, we met with 20 young creatives for a talk on Nucco Brain’s 5-year journey as an agency.

We discussed some of the pitfalls to avoid and pointers to strive for in creating and growing a content production agency. So, here were the takeaway points that we believe will allow every content agency to flourish, and get its story heard.

1. If you are for everyone, you are for no-one

It goes without saying that you are founding a content agency for a reason – you have a story to tell, or the tools to tell one – something special that sets you apart. The first thing you need to do when growing a content agency is to focus on these key business values that you bring to the table and consider how you plan to use them to make a name for yourself. What is your unique selling point? Can you meet the needs of a niche customer base with a particular point of view?

For example, here at Nucco Brain, we combine intuitive storytelling with innovative technologies in animation, VR and AR to visualise brands’ messages in a memorable way. It’s important to know how your agency makes its mark, because if you haven’t nailed down your own unique value, how are you going to sell it to clients?

2. HR & processes matter

As a content agency, your team is going to be made up of creative souls – we get it, we’re the same. However, you have to make sure that, amidst all of the brainstorming, crafting and creating, the operational side of your businesses doesn’t get lost. HR and processes matter, and it will take time and effort to get them right. This will develop as you grow as an agency – at first, everyone in your team will have to multitask and play more than one role, but as you expand, it’s important to ensure that everyone is clear about their individual role and responsibilities.

This will ensure that externally, the client knows who they are talking to, and internally, there is no breakdown in communication through the production process which could harm the quality of your projects. The magic is in the process, not just the end product. With each project you take on, pay attention to your process and adapt it based on what works and what doesn’t – and then ensure these changes are implemented throughout your team.

3. Stay Up to Date

Whilst it is vital to know what sets your agency apart, it is also important to root yourself and to know your place in the market you are entering. With no sense of your wider creative environment, you will become lost, and struggle to signpost your presence to clients navigating the market.

So, stay up to date with market and global trends in all areas – not just your niche, and practice the art of adapting what you know to capitalise on current trends.

4. Don’t Mistake a Spike for a Trend

As we’ve said, it’s important to be plugged into market trends, but at the same time, don’t mistake a spike for a trend. Agencies that constantly try to remodel their entire process to match every fleeting viral obsession lose their sense of identity and struggle to survive in the long term.

Agencies can grow and die off of one account – don’t build your business model over one project alone, without thinking of the journey that takes you there. Similarly, be wary of serving that one client that eats up all your resources and finding yourself with no project afterwards. Treat your agency holistically, and always keep an eye on the long view.

5. When Business is Good Don’t Forget About Business

This leads us to our final point: when business is good, don’t forget about business. Creatives can often be tempted to lose themselves in their art – but you must resist this urge in order to keep growing as an agency! Don’t become absorbed within a single project, remember to keep the practicals in mind.

This means marketing your services, networking with other companies and industry figures, and taking every opportunity to grow your resources and nurture your talents. And, of course, don’t forget about new talent – new blood brings new perspectives and opportunities to innovate.

Feature Photo by Daria Nepriakhina on Unsplash

Toronto & Chicago Trade Mission: How’s business across the Atlantic?

A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of taking part in a trade mission to Toronto and Chicago, hosted by the Mayor’s International Business Programme (MIBP) and London & Partners (L&P). The aim, along with my trade mission brothers and sisters, was to scope out North America and see whether our fast-growth start-ups (with turnovers of £1m or more) see value in expanding across the pond. Fourteen UK-based businesses, on a mission to take over the world… well, not quite, but you get the point. These businesses were split between the two broad categories of Edu-Tech and B2B-Tech. Nucco Brain doesn’t fit specifically well into either of these, from a tech point of view, but we certainly work with clients in both sectors to produce content for their platforms, apps, experiences or general marketing. Broad scope, for Nucco then, to see whether there are North American partners we could collaborate with in the future. The sun was out, the skies were clear and the people (as expected) were extremely friendly and accommodating – all things looking bright to kick off what would be an eventful week!

Tuesday 

We started off at Toronto Region Board of Trade, where we heard what Toronto had to offer as a city for startups – excellent talent pool, easy trade throughout Canada and only a hop, skip and a jump from the US border. Canada has some great incentives for businesses who are innovating (with things like the SCHRED tax incentive for R&D) and trade agreements with the US means that the border is pretty invisible when it comes to providing services. There was a panel discussion with the leading Edu-Tech businesses in Toronto, as well as key stakeholders within the education sector, giving their views on the pros and cons of the Toronto market as a whole. Needless to say, there were far more pros than cons!

Wednesday 

We went to one of the WeWork’s in Toronto, to investigate one of the sites where startups have flourished already in the Toronto scene. We then headed to our respective airports to catch flights over to Chicago, the second stage of our mission. After arriving and checking into our hotels, we went to a lovely evening soiree, hosted by the British Consul General, at his residence in Chicago. All I can say is WOW – his residence was amazingly impressive and it was truly an evening where great connections were made (I won’t go into too much detail about the amazing Friday night I had with someone I met here… maybe for another blog that 😉 )

Thursday

 Our final full day on the mission started with a trip to 1871 – Chicago’s very own center for technology and entrepreneurship. Here we were given similar treatment to that of the Toronto Region Board of Trade – this time from World Business Chicago. Speakers told us the major benefits of expanding to Chicago: there are a large number of Fortune 500 companies HQs in Chicago, it’s in the Midwest so connected easily to both the East and West coasts, there is already a mature startup scene with open doors to newcomers. All sounds good to me! Next stop? The Motorola HQ and the Google offices, to see the space they had both developed in Chicago – super impressive spaces, for sure! The final stop of the day – WeWork Chicago: this time to pitch in a ‘Shark Tank’ style environment (Dragon’s Den for any UK readers). It was somewhat nerve-wracking to pitch your business to a panel of 3 successful entrepreneurs (as well as attendees of the networking event that followed) but everyone on the mission did an excellent job. If nothing else, it was a great experience to be a part of (and I think we’d all spieled about our businesses enough by that point to be pretty clear on what we needed to say). Another great day in another great city…

Friday

 Another colleague and I traveled to a film, media and entertainment incubator called 2112. This was an awesome part of the trip for me, as a big fan of music and film production – it’s 160,000sqft of filming, audio recording, mixing and production studio space, with a startup incubator at the heart of it. Words can’t describe this place (it took us about 3 hours to get the full tour) but the sheer scale of it blew my mind. They’re doing awesome things at 2112, facilitated by the founder Scott Fetters (who is a great mind and took me on the unforgettable Friday night out I mentioned earlier). Worth checking them out, for sure, if you’re ever in Chi-town!

In summary 

The trade mission was a great explorative experience, where I met loads of businesses Nucco Brain could collaborate with in the future. Chicago, particularly, left an impression on me and made me think it would be a great place to expand our business into North America, eventually. The guys at L&P were a great help and organised an awesome week of activities. On top of that, the people I was on the mission with were a great bunch of people and I hope to see them at some point in the future on that side of the pond, expanding our businesses together – here’s hoping that’s sooner rather than later! 😀

By Mark Kershaw

Client Engagement Director at Nucco Brain

(photo by Pedro Lastra on Unsplash)

News from Annecy 2018: The Latest Trends in the Animation World

We have to admit, we were more than a little excited to attend this year’s MIFA Animation Festival. It’s the time of year to catch that plane to the little alpine town of Annecy in France and geek out on the latest animations. 

People come from across the globe to showcase their work, delighting industry professionals and fans with their creative skills. This melting pot of talent plus a fun, irreverent vibe puts it top of the list of any of our industry’s events.  After all, where else can you find attendees throwing paper airplanes fashioned from event programmes at the cinema screen, to uproarious cheers each time one hits the target. Just magic! But aside from all this, there were some serious talking points on the agenda this year that got us fired up:

Women getting serious kudos

Picture designed by Mathilda Holmqvist

We don’t need to tell you that gender equality is a hot topic at the moment, and with good reason. It’s something that’s receiving big attention throughout the media world, and in the animation industry, it’s no different. The head of the festival signed a pledge to promote gender equality both at the festival itself and within the organisational staff.

We’ve loved to hear that CITIA, the organisation responsible for the event, has an equal split of male and female executives. But still, only 20% of the films that made the cut for the festival are directed by women, showing there’s still progress to be made. Despite this, the festival’s good work in promoting gender equality can’t be denied. This year the focus on women, including presenting Women in Animation with the Mifa Animation Industry Award.  

The rise of digital channels

Hot off the back of France Television’s decision to cancel the France 4 channel, the people behind Annecy festival and us here at Nucco Brain are contemplating the rise of digital. Why, you may ask? The dropped channel distributed mainly kid’s content and animation, and now it will be moved onto digital platforms.

While broadcasting and production companies reverberate with this news, their potential deals being washed out, there’s a bigger discussion to be had around the role of digital. There’s no escaping the effect digital transformation is having on the industry, with more people fragmenting onto digital channels, where funding possibilities are reduced compared to the budget broadcasters are used to.

On a more positive note, the digital trend could well have some advantages. This is especially true for brands who could provide a new source of funding outside the traditional broadcasting business model. You only need to take a look at some of the online digital and VR content highlighted in the festival to see just how powerful new technology can be.

Annecy is now over, but we already can’t wait to be there next year – and we’ll make sure to perfect our paper airplane flying techniques in the meantime!

The Power Of Effective Explainer Videos

Corporate comm. often involves complex information spanning dry topics. Making this info digestible and accessible without turning your audience off in seconds is the challenge!

Explainer videos are one clever way of getting points across in an engaging way. Structure and style play a big role in effective explainer videos. But with the right creative approach you can tap into your audience’s imagination and create a communications piece that’s set to grab attention, even across the trickiest topics.

Making it accessible

Our brains work in a certain way when it comes to processing information. The more intricate the subject, the bigger the need to break it down and make it easy to digest. Think from your own point of view. Everyone’s been in a situation at one time or another where they felt overloaded with information.

To work effectively, explainer videos can’t simply dump huge amount of detail within the first few moments. Instead, they need to follow a clear structure to guide the viewer through the points one at a time. This all starts with a hook. Forget about conveying a range of messages in the first seconds.

To really engage your audience, you’ll need to grab attention with something that’ll pique interest. From there, you can guide them through a journey of awareness, moving onto basic information, then delving into the more complex core of the piece once the viewer is comfortable and engaged.  

Let’s take as an example the latest explainer video we have produced for the European Space Agency on 5G technology:

Find out more about this project

Within the first few seconds the narrator states a fact relevant to all audience members: “being connected is everything”. Through this one sentence, the audience is able to relate to the video’s topic – a hook prompting them to keep watching until the end.

What about style?

Style matters in explainer videos. Because they’re all about appealing to viewers in a novel way, the look and feel of the video will be an important factor in grabbing attention and keeping the audience involved.

Stylised characters are a tried and tested way of enticing an audience to identify with scenarios in explainer videos. Adding a personality to the comms, animated characters, such as the ones created for the 5G video,  open doors for people to relate to the complex topic of the video.

Make the story feel personal

 A narrative with a personal angle is the best way to create a link with your viewer. That means developing a specific story with a certain point of view that’s likely to appeal to your audience. But it shouldn’t end there.

Tying this in with your personal angle as a brand will help you bridge the gap between audience and message, as well as conveying your overall identity. In the ESA video for example, following an explanation of the 5G network and its benefit to the public, the video highlights how the European Space Agency is involved with the technology – thus bringing back the discussion to its core business.

Do it right, and this is what will really make your explainer video stand out from other content pieces.  Interested in learning more? We’ve previously written about our production process for explainer videos on our blog:

Complex ≠ Complicated: 4 Best Practices To Turn B2B Communication Into Exciting Content

Nucco Brain’s Recipe for a Successful Branded Content YouTube Series

 

The Future of Healthcare: Communicating Innovation

A few weeks ago I attended an event that held the title “Innovate or Stagnate: Can Technology Keep the NHS Healthy” – it was an interesting evening of talks from some of the leading experts in the field. I came away with mixed feelings though – hope at the thought of technology saving our beloved NHS, despair at the thought of how or whether they’ll implement it all in time.

Communicating innovation is one of the more challenging adventures in the marketing industry – people want and fear change at the same time. They want it because the future holds exciting opportunities; they fear it because they may not understand the implications, costs or impact it will have on tried and tested circumstances.

To get it right, businesses who are innovating have a need to be constantly engaging the parties who are implementing these innovations and aware of how they communicate with their many different audiences. In the case of the NHS, it is the government, health trusts, payers and healthcare professionals who need to understand how these innovations save money, time and, most importantly, the lives of patients under their care. Further even, it is the patients and the general public at the end of the line who are directly experiencing the ease and improvement of experience that innovation in healthcare could bring, and the future potential it has.

On Thursday,  June 21, we are hosting an event called the Future of Healthcare: Communicating Innovation where our managing director Stefano Marrone will be discussing how brands can and should build a consistent narrative on innovation and sensitive health topics to different audiences across different visual assets. A focus will be on strategies to overcome some of the main challenges associated with public health communication campaigns such as finding ways to both raise awareness and drive behavioural changes within multiple audiences.

Tickets are available here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/future-of-healthcare-communicating-innovation-tickets-46326935110?aff=es2

Communicating innovation to different audiences requires special skills and unique approaches. Let us teach you how.

-Mark Kershaw

Client Engagement Director

GDPR is Here: How to Communicate Corporate Changes Effectively

The time has come where we can no longer hide away from GDPR. As of this week, on May 25th, the new legislation will come into force, replacing the old and outdated Data Protection Act, to protect people’s personal data.

 

Getting your team GDPR-ready

Being GDPR ready does not only mean complying with the new legislation, you also need to provide your staff with the knowledge and the tools to work within the new regulations. Effective training and communication campaigns are the key for ensuring your teams are onboard and in-the-know.

When it comes to communicating new legislation, our team has collaborated with Deloitte M.E on a variety of projects. One of these included explaining the concept and implementation of VAT and Excise taxes to a business audience unfamiliar with the concept in the Middle East.

Through infographics and videos, we helped local businesses explain complicated tax systems to their audience in an easy-to-understand narrative. In the same way, visual storytelling is a smart, memorable approach to communicating essential information on the GDPR. Here’s why:

 

An interesting hook gets more attention

 

What’s drier than communicating the specifics of a new, complicated legislation? The answer is, not many things. For most, reading through the intricacies of a new regulation is less engaging than watching paint dry. Visual storytelling can bring important to life. By creating a hook that will capture the viewer’s attention, you can take them on a journey from awareness, to basic info, to the more detailed information and small print in a few logical, memorable steps.    

 

Simplifying complex info makes it accessible

 

Rather than swamping people with technical jargon and overly complicated content, visuals allow you to communicate intricate ideas in bitesize form. This will effectively break down the reams of information your business audience might find online into relevant, salient points.

 

Storylines make it personal

 

Telling a story with a personal angle is the fastest way to connect with an audience. Visual storytelling gives you the platform to do just that. By creating characters and storylines that resonate, you’ll be speaking to your audience on a level. Being able to identify with the narrative is one powerful way of ensuring messages are absorbed and understood.   

 

Ultimately, GDPR is here, and it’s set to revolutionise the way we hold and use data. Being on top of the changes at all levels of your business is essential to avoid those fines. Through creative communication and visual storytelling, you can drive an effective GDPR comms campaign that resonates and stays with your audience.

Koko Kanu selected at Supertoon International Animation Festival

We are super proud to be in competition at the Supertoon International Animation Festival in the animated commercial category with our film “Koko Kanu – Add some adventure”. The festival will take place in Šibenik, Croatia, from 22th to 27th  July 2018.

Last year, our team worked with Koko Kanu, part of the Campari Group, to create a world of exotic elegance and adventure for their summer launch.  Alongside the animated video, we also created a set of gifs and images to share across the brand’s social media platforms for their special summer launch campaign.

Find out more about this project

Credits

Client: Gruppo Campari
Director: Stefano Marrone
Art Director: Stefano Perelli
Visual Development: Ariel Vittori
Background Design: Laura Guglielmo
Storyboarding and Layout: Leonie Despres
2D Animation: Jorden Oliwa
Animation: Robert Scott, Nicholas Edmonson, Clement Sacchetti
Graphic Design: Thomas Gutteridge
Sound Design: WeAreListeners

Reporting on MIPTV 2018: What The Advertising World Can Learn From TV Series

A few weeks ago, we were at the MIPTV market in Cannes where our VR project EDF Nuclear Symphony was featured at the innovation hub. On this occasion, we also got to see some of the latest TV series out.

The simplistic idea that one advert is the best tool to promote or sell a product is no longer one that holds water. Technology and an explosion of content has ramped up the competition when it comes to brands making noise and gaining attention. In a world where millions of videos and blogs are uploaded onto the web every day, creating something that stands out and engages audiences is more important than ever.

These past few years, TV series have gained popularity worldwide as a major source of entertainment, and brands are turning to this strong narrative format to hook audiences.

Communicating brand identity

Think of how gripping a great TV series can be. This same series format is being used in advertising to hook an audience around a story. Why a story, and not a product? Because it appeals on a level that simply selling a product can’t. It’s visceral, experience-based and allows people to see how the brand can enhance their lifestyle.

The series format, whether on TV or the web, also enables brands to communicate their values in a natural way.  This approach to visual storytelling presents a big opportunity when getting across not only messages, but the personality of a brand, to actively engage audiences.

Take a look at the web series Future Predictions that we are currently producing for Innovate UK as an example. Within 18 months of releasing the first episode, Innovate UK’s YouTube channel subscriptions increased by 730%.

Extending experiences

Great TV shows are so compelling precisely because we follow the characters. We grow to feel something for them over time. Crucially, it gives people headspace to form opinions of the storylines and characters, and to feel involved.

Series advertising uses those exact same principles. By presenting a narrative experience that unfolds over a number of episodes, viewers have the chance to consider their experience, and share it with other audience members. This is a great way of building active engagement. Ideal for creating the buzz needed in such a competitive brand environment.

Creativity that surprises and delights

Online audiences expect more and being able to delight them with fresh content is the way to increase engagement and brand connection. An extended story with a strong narrative creates the perfect tool to build on those expectations. Showcasing not only brand values, but ingenuity and creativity. Collaborations with well known filmmakers to create compelling series have increased in the past year. For example, Luca Guadagnino’s series Walking Stories done for Salvatore Ferragamo.

Exactly as TV series do, an advertising campaign with a narrative gives brands an opportunity to surprise people with plot twists, and keep their audience on their toes, tuned in, ready to engage, and willing to share their experience with other viewers.
At the end of the day, people are looking for those immersive experiences. By taking what we know of the TV series format, we can develop interactive experiences that appeal, stand out and create connections with audiences.

Nucco Brain at D&AD!

We were at the D&AD festival this morning with a full house!

Our MD, Stefano Marrone, gave a talk on content production and how brands are the new content publishers… they just don’t know it yet.

A common trend observed these past few years is that audiences  have a constant hunger for content – good content, and brands have both the drive and resources to fulfil this desire.

Every month, our studio organises regular breakfast workshops on visual storytelling  and how brands can improve their content production strategy.  Check out our Eventbrite page and reserve your spot for our next event.

Insights from our world

Visit Us On InstagramVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On Linkedin