Category Archives: Events

Want to reduce production time and cost for your content strategy…

… while maximising resources and creativity? Nucco Brain’s new process will change your approach to content production.

See it in action!

Multi-channel, omni-channel, cross-channel.

Terms that are flung about willy-nilly these days to try and reinforce the fact that “WE HAVE MANY CHANNELS NOW AND YOU SHOULD USE THEM ALL FOR COMMS!!!”

“Companies with the strongest omni-channel customer engagement strategies retain an average of 89% of their customers, as compared to 33% for companies with weak omni-channel strategies.” – Aberdeen.

So, in reality, omni-channel is important for obtaining and retaining customers.

Simple as that.

With that said, having the knowledge of how to maximise production (i.e how to create content that works across all these fabulous channels) is still something of a rarity. This leads to duplication, lack of consistency and poor use of budget and time.

This means marketers are left with less time, less budget, less freedom to try anything new or bold.

Sad times.

Traditionally, advertising, marketing and communications agencies might have helped out here. They develop strategies to bring consistency and ‘one voice’ to the communications. They plan production pipelines to deliver in line with the strategy and available budget.

With the need to produce a range of different content, in an agile, multi-channel manner, the traditional agency model is being tested by shifts in the market (specifically the less time/budget/freedom to try anything new or bold conundrum).

Internal marketing teams are either taking production in-house or are asking a number of specialist studios to provide a different piece of their content marketing puzzle. This can come with its own set of problems – from the ‘Chinese whispers’ effect of communication between studios to the different ways of approaching production – and can actually lead to more issues than were encountered with a more traditional agency approach.

A Production Workflow designed with Cross-Channel in mind

At Nucco Brain, we have developed a bespoke production workflow for cross-channel, agile and scalable production. With this workflow, we can produce visual content that works in more traditional ways (visual branding, animation, etc) but then expands them across the range of digital channels (interactive videos, gamified learning/training content, digital OOH, AR, VR, etc).

We call this workflow TrueTime Rendering – leveraging game engine technology to produce content in ways that can be upscaled in an agile manner. We can produce flat video content with it. We can then turn it into a 360º video, using the very same assets. We can then add interactivity to this content with a few extra clicks (I’m oversimplifying but, again, it’s the same assets and the same engine). We can then develop this further, to an AR or VR experience (again, using the same assets and the same engine).

There’s no need to export to another format and ‘adapt’ it to another engine to scale up the experience. The TrueTime Rendering workflow means we can reuse all the assets and add on the bits we need, as and when needed. No more ‘I wish we’d built that with VR in mind’ moments – our workflow allows for these considerations to come up as and when fits the business needs.

Cut out the rendering time

One of the main benefits of utilising a game engine for the development of content is the rendering times.

Traditional 3D content production, using the likes 3DS Max, Maya or After Effects, comes with its own set of problems. While the power of these applications is undeniable, for some things it’s just not needed.

You may be familiar with the idea of having to change a production asset, or animated sequence, or lighting setup, or whatever other change you wanted to see happen in the content you were making. You then have to hit render and go for a walk/go to lunch/leave it running over night. The main issue with this is, after waiting all that time, you may want to make another change… that’s a lot of dead time for some potentially minor changes, even with access to a render farm.

The TrueTime Rendering workflow is based on using a game engine – one built for real-time rendering on a multitude of devices. Given the engine itself is built to render in real-time, the render time for any piece of content should be about as long as the content itself.

Producing a 1 minute animation? Don’t like that last animated sequence? TrueTime Rendering will have your changes ready to view in approximately 1 minute. Want to add in some additional interactivity? Once you’ve set the parameters, give it about 1 minute and you’ll be able to test them out.

From a client/studio point of view, this means you can iterate away without the dead time that’s plagued production processes for so long – rendering! This means you can try things out without the fear of a wasted iteration, taking hours to put back to where it was (instead of the minutes it would take with TrueTime).

Style = Substance

There are some cases where TrueTime isn’t the answer. Photo-real CGI, live action or photography, Hollywood-level VFX – that’s not really what TrueTime is about.

We developed the workflow specifically for high-output, multi-channel communications. Video series, interactive learning, AR walls, virtual reality experiences – that’s TrueTime’s bag.

For TrueTime to work at its best, we need to turn to the power of stylisation. Bear with me while I go a little off-pitste here and talk about comic book theory. I promise you, it’s relevant to B2B and corporate communications too.

Scott McCloud, a leading comic’s theorist, shows us why stylisation works wonders when trying to engage with a broad audience (he talks about comic book readers – I’m drawing the parallel to communications). We live in an increasingly symbol/icon/emoji-based world and already engage with the idea of stylisation – these symbols can be understood as an image utilised to represent a place, person, object or idea.

McCloud says humans are a“self-centered race”, unconsciously looking for ourselves in what we see. In this way, a simple cartoon such as a circle with two dots for eyes and a line for lips silently communicates to its readers that this is a face. Importantly, it is impossible for the reader not to see a face, because our minds are programmed to recognise and relate this icon back to ourselves.

So, back to the point of why stylisation works for what we’re talking about here: B2B and corporate comms.

When we talk about illustration, animation, infographics, CGI, VR, AR, etc – stylisation enhances storytelling because it lets the audience focus on the message, as opposed to whether or not the characters in the story are an accurate representation of who they are.

The message comes through stronger and connects with the audience effectively.

Job done.

The well-oiled production machine

For large businesses with many stakeholders (their customers, their suppliers, their employees, their shareholders, etc) getting a consistent, effective, engaging content calendar together can cause headaches. Constant engagement of these various audiences – coordinated across a number of marketing teams spread over a number of international markets – well, that can keep people up at night.

As technology and creativity become more intertwined, there’s no need for B2B or corporate comms to suffer from a lack of innovation when it comes to content production. If the marketing team’s job is to define the vision and mission of the business, this shouldn’t be obstructed by convoluted production approaches.

TrueTime Rendering offers a real solution for creative visual content production, giving time and flexibility back to marketing teams. The ability to scale an idea all the way up from print to a VR headset leads to increased campaign longevity, more cost-effective budgets and an agile timeline that responds to the needs of the business.

At Nucco Brain, we’re excited to share this workflow with the world and are hosting a dedicated event on Wednesday, 12th September, from 8:30am – 10:30am, at Runway East Moorgate. We’ll be delving into how it works and will be looking at the use cases we have already applied this method to.

If you’d like to find out more, you can sign up at the Eventbrite page here and learn more about how TrueTime can help maximise your content marketing calendar.

5 Pieces of Advice to Grow a Content Agency

Last month, our team once again collaborated with D&AD, this time for their New Blood Festival in celebration of new artistic talents. As part of the event, we met with 20 young creatives for a talk on Nucco Brain’s 5-year journey as an agency.

We discussed some of the pitfalls to avoid and pointers to strive for in creating and growing a content production agency. So, here were the takeaway points that we believe will allow every content agency to flourish, and get its story heard.

1. If you are for everyone, you are for no-one

It goes without saying that you are founding a content agency for a reason – you have a story to tell, or the tools to tell one – something special that sets you apart. The first thing you need to do when growing a content agency is to focus on these key business values that you bring to the table and consider how you plan to use them to make a name for yourself. What is your unique selling point? Can you meet the needs of a niche customer base with a particular point of view?

For example, here at Nucco Brain, we combine intuitive storytelling with innovative technologies in animation, VR and AR to visualise brands’ messages in a memorable way. It’s important to know how your agency makes its mark, because if you haven’t nailed down your own unique value, how are you going to sell it to clients?

2. HR & processes matter

As a content agency, your team is going to be made up of creative souls – we get it, we’re the same. However, you have to make sure that, amidst all of the brainstorming, crafting and creating, the operational side of your businesses doesn’t get lost. HR and processes matter, and it will take time and effort to get them right. This will develop as you grow as an agency – at first, everyone in your team will have to multitask and play more than one role, but as you expand, it’s important to ensure that everyone is clear about their individual role and responsibilities.

This will ensure that externally, the client knows who they are talking to, and internally, there is no breakdown in communication through the production process which could harm the quality of your projects. The magic is in the process, not just the end product. With each project you take on, pay attention to your process and adapt it based on what works and what doesn’t – and then ensure these changes are implemented throughout your team.

3. Stay Up to Date

Whilst it is vital to know what sets your agency apart, it is also important to root yourself and to know your place in the market you are entering. With no sense of your wider creative environment, you will become lost, and struggle to signpost your presence to clients navigating the market.

So, stay up to date with market and global trends in all areas – not just your niche, and practice the art of adapting what you know to capitalise on current trends.

4. Don’t Mistake a Spike for a Trend

As we’ve said, it’s important to be plugged into market trends, but at the same time, don’t mistake a spike for a trend. Agencies that constantly try to remodel their entire process to match every fleeting viral obsession lose their sense of identity and struggle to survive in the long term.

Agencies can grow and die off of one account – don’t build your business model over one project alone, without thinking of the journey that takes you there. Similarly, be wary of serving that one client that eats up all your resources and finding yourself with no project afterwards. Treat your agency holistically, and always keep an eye on the long view.

5. When Business is Good Don’t Forget About Business

This leads us to our final point: when business is good, don’t forget about business. Creatives can often be tempted to lose themselves in their art – but you must resist this urge in order to keep growing as an agency! Don’t become absorbed within a single project, remember to keep the practicals in mind.

This means marketing your services, networking with other companies and industry figures, and taking every opportunity to grow your resources and nurture your talents. And, of course, don’t forget about new talent – new blood brings new perspectives and opportunities to innovate.

The Future of Healthcare: Communicating Innovation

A few weeks ago I attended an event that held the title “Innovate or Stagnate: Can Technology Keep the NHS Healthy” – it was an interesting evening of talks from some of the leading experts in the field. I came away with mixed feelings though – hope at the thought of technology saving our beloved NHS, despair at the thought of how or whether they’ll implement it all in time.

Communicating innovation is one of the more challenging adventures in the marketing industry – people want and fear change at the same time. They want it because the future holds exciting opportunities; they fear it because they may not understand the implications, costs or impact it will have on tried and tested circumstances.

To get it right, businesses who are innovating have a need to be constantly engaging the parties who are implementing these innovations and aware of how they communicate with their many different audiences. In the case of the NHS, it is the government, health trusts, payers and healthcare professionals who need to understand how these innovations save money, time and, most importantly, the lives of patients under their care. Further even, it is the patients and the general public at the end of the line who are directly experiencing the ease and improvement of experience that innovation in healthcare could bring, and the future potential it has.

On Thursday,  June 21, we are hosting an event called the Future of Healthcare: Communicating Innovation where our managing director Stefano Marrone will be discussing how brands can and should build a consistent narrative on innovation and sensitive health topics to different audiences across different visual assets. A focus will be on strategies to overcome some of the main challenges associated with public health communication campaigns such as finding ways to both raise awareness and drive behavioural changes within multiple audiences.

Tickets are available here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/future-of-healthcare-communicating-innovation-tickets-46326935110?aff=es2

Communicating innovation to different audiences requires special skills and unique approaches. Let us teach you how.

-Mark Kershaw

Client Engagement Director